Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Live Wire

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 9
31
Tutorials / Re: All Known and Unknown Autostart Methods In Windows
« on: October 09, 2012, 07:32:04 am »
Thats handy, thanks

32
Operating System / Re: Lightweight OS?
« on: October 03, 2012, 09:45:57 pm »
God damn Puppy linux. I fucking love that distro. Very small, portable, fast as a rabbit fuck and with many, MANY tools and programs. Fits on my 1GB flash where I keep my documents and other stuff, and I still have more than half of drive space to use!!

sweet, I was actually right about something for once  :)

33
Found it on the Webs / Python Forensics
« on: September 26, 2012, 04:12:23 pm »
A friend of mine showed this to me, wrote by one of his professors at the academy. All about forensics programming.  Hope you enjoy!

http://computer-forensics.sans.org/community/papers/gcfa/grow-forensic-tools-taxonomy-python-libraries-helpful-forensic-analysis_6879

34
C - C++ / Re: My code needs a tune up.
« on: September 26, 2012, 07:41:11 am »
in all of your if/else statements you need to change = to == . other than that, it looks okay. to me at anyway :)

35
C - C++ / Re: Basic C++ program (Good place to start)
« on: September 26, 2012, 07:35:09 am »
oh, I know how to use namespace, I'm just using my schools ass old compilers, which for some reason freak out whenever I use it.
 
and yeah, I'm a java guy. But the best way to learn is to teach, right?

36
High Quality Tutorials / Re: [Guide] Which Language To Start With
« on: September 25, 2012, 08:36:56 pm »
I vote that before people actually start programming, the become at flowcharting.

37
C - C++ / Re: Basic C++ program (Good place to start)
« on: September 25, 2012, 06:07:04 pm »
Here's an improved algorithm and style if you don't mind ^^

Code: C
  1. #include <iostream.h>
  2. #include <math.h>
  3.  
  4. int main(void)
  5. {    
  6.     //vars
  7.     int inNum;
  8.     bool check = true;
  9.    
  10.     //setup
  11.     cout << "\nPlease enter the number: ";
  12.     cin >> inNum;
  13.    
  14.     int limit = sqrt(inNum);
  15.     // actual calcs
  16.     for (int i = 2; i < limit; i++){
  17.         if (inNum % i == 0){
  18.             check = false;
  19.             break;
  20.         }
  21.     } // end for
  22.    
  23.     if (check == false)
  24.         cout << "\nNumber is not prime!\n\n";
  25.     else
  26.         cout << "\nNumber is prime!\n\n";
  27.    
  28.    return 0;   //for OS, everything was fine
  29. }//end of main
  30.  

hmmm, didn't even think of doing it that way. Thanks. But what did you think of the tut?

38
Elite social engineer, pro skiddie killer, junior programmer, full time asshole.

39
General discussion / Re: Fun at school
« on: September 25, 2012, 12:20:10 pm »
I'm in the same boat as you man. Senior year, so much fun! Want to get back at the teachers for all the crap they make you do! Almost a full adult!  But I got caught for some stuff a few years ago. Just skiddie stuff, so no big deal. Long story short, I'm now kind of a pentester for my schools network admin. Find a bug, see how far it goes, report it. Maybe you could pull off something like this.
 
Yeah, we made it this far. Lets not screw it up now.  :)

40
High Quality Tutorials / Re: [Guide] Which Language To Start With
« on: September 25, 2012, 12:13:30 pm »
What I suggest them before choosing their first language is to think what they really want to code, from there do a research on which language can make your plan possible.

I agree with HeRo. Don't learn a language you don't need just because it's recomended. Personally, I started in batch because I wanted to screw with my friends. Figure out what you want to make, learn how to make it, then find another project. Then you start getting good at everything, not just one thing.
 
*shrug* That's what I do.
 
 
*also, the best ide ever created for python/perl is gedit. End of story.

41
Operating System / Re: Lightweight OS?
« on: September 25, 2012, 11:59:30 am »
A little larger, but still small. Puppy linux, or even mint.

42
C - C++ / Basic C++ program (Good place to start)
« on: September 25, 2012, 11:30:45 am »
Hey guys. Made this piece of code this for my TI for the upcoming SAT. Then I thought that it has a lot of good intro c++ stuff. So I'm going to do a break-down of the code. Hope you enjoy!!
 
First, the whole code.
 
Code: [Select]

#include <iostream.h>
 
int main(){
   
    //vars
    int inNum;
    bool check = true;
   
    //setup
    cout << "\nPlease enter the number: ";
    cin >> inNum;
   
    // actual calcs
         
    for (int i = 2; i < inNum && check;){
        if (inNum%i != 0){
           i++;
           
        }else{
            check = false;
        }
             
    } //end for
   
    if (check == false){
          cout << "\nNumber is not prime!\n\n";
    }else if (check == true){
          cout << "\nNumber is prime!\n\n";
    }else{
          cout << "\n\n\nWTF?\n\n";
    }
   
   return 0;   //for syntax only!!!   
}//end of main

Okay, #1
Code: [Select]
#include <iostream.h>

This just tells the program that we want to be able to process basic input. This is used for a lot of things, but I'm just getting stuff from the keyboard.
 
#2
Code: [Select]
int main(){
   
    //vars
    int inNum;
    bool check = true;

We declare the main method, of the int type. We then declare the variables we want to use in the program. Personally, I like to declare all of my vars upfront. Here we use an int (basically a simple number) and a bool (logic statement (true/false)).
 
#3
Code: [Select]
    //setup
    cout << "\nPlease enter the number: ";
    cin >> inNum;

This is a VERY important step! This is where we use the IO functions of C++. cout tells the program to print the specified text, and cin takes the inputed data, and stores it in the variable we already declared (int inNum;).
 
*the \n is used to make a new line. The // is used for comments, and not used in the actual program.


#4
Code: [Select]
   for (i = 2; i < inNum && check;){
        if (inNum%i != 0){
           i++;
           
        }else{
            check = false;
        }
             
    } //end for
 

Okay, now we're moving into real programming. We used a for loop here. In a nutshell, I instructed the program to create a new variable (int i), and set its value to 1. Then, I told the program to keep running while i < inNum AND check is still true. After this, I could have created a number of other statements, but I only needed two. This is the real use of the for loop. Normally, it is used to declare, check, and increment a value. Since you can do all of this from a single statement, it is better for this than a while loop.
 
After that, we introduce the if/else statment. These take a statment, check if they are true, and execute the code depending on the outcome.
 
 Next, I use the mod (%) sign. This is just returning the remainder of inNum / the current value of i. We then check to see if the remainder does not equal (!=) 0. This tells us that the number is not prime, so we can keep checking for higher values of i (i++ (adding 1 to the value of x) ). If we find that it ever DOES equal 0, it cannot be prime and we set the boolean logic variable check to false. This means that the loop can no longer continue, and we stop checking for values.
 
#5
Code: [Select]
    //if/else
 
    if (check == false){
          cout << "\nNumber is not prime!\n\n";
    }else if (check == true){
          cout << "\nNumber is prime!\n\n";
    }else{
          cout << "\n\n\nWTF?\n\n";
    }

This is the basic programming logic statement. Rember we set check to false if the inputed number is not prime. In *MOST* programming, you will use  =  to assign a value, and  ==  to compare something's value to another value.
 
Here, we look to see if check is false or true. If check is false, the number is not prime, and we report this to the user. If check is true, we tell the user. If a magnet was used to wipe a specifc point of your memory in the split second it took to check this, it outputs this to the user. Can't be to prepared, can you?
 
#6
Code: [Select]
return 0;   //for syntax only!!!   
}//end of main

We then end to code. The return of 0 isn't required, but is good for syntax.
 
 
 
 
I tried to do the best I could with the syntax. This is the first tut I've ever done, so any pointers would be helpful.
 
As usual, any feedback appriciated!

43
Hacking and Security / Re: cracking passwords
« on: September 20, 2012, 07:45:55 am »
I tried this site. Took like a month to get a result.

44
Hacking and Security / Re: Is there anyone who can unlock this? please...
« on: September 11, 2012, 07:42:37 pm »

there are 1000's of site on google for cracking zip files
tutorials, programs and all kind of shitt

yeah, i was just looking at those. Might read some of the math and make my own, if i ever have free time again  >:(

45
Hacking and Security / Re: Is there anyone who can unlock this? please...
« on: September 11, 2012, 07:30:14 pm »
eh, what they said. Bruteforce it. And holly shit, there are girls on this site? no offense of course. But yeah, brute or dict, best shot. still might try this sometime though....

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 9


Intern0t SoldierX SecurityOverride programisiai
Want to be here? Contact Ande, Factionwars or Kulverstukas on the forum or at IRC.